Episode 004: Craig Groeschel

About This Episode

In this practical leadership message, Craig Groeschel describes strategies for how both older and younger leaders can interact in more productive ways in the workplace. He encourages older leaders to invest in the younger generation. At the same time, he urges younger leaders to intentionally honor those who have gone before them.

People On This Episode

Craig Groeschel
@craiggroeschel

Jared C. Wilkins
Podcast Host
@JaredCWilkins

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SUMMARY:

In this practical leadership message, Craig Groeschel describes strategies for how both older and younger leaders can interact in more productive ways in the workplace. He encourages older leaders to invest in the younger generation. At the same time, he urges younger leaders to intentionally honor those who have gone before them.

KEY TAKEAWAYS:

  1. There’s misunderstanding between generations today.
  2. To the older generation: If you’re not dead, you’re not done. Your best days could be ahead of you.
    • Do not simply delegate tasks to the next generation. That creates followers. Instead, delegate authority. That builds leaders.
    • With the younger generation, authenticity trumps cool every time.
  3. To the younger generation: You need those who came before you.
    • The one word that was most commonly used to describe 20-somethings in the workplace: Entitled.
    • Young leaders overestimate what they can accomplish in the short run, but they underestimate what they can do over a lifetime of faithfulness.
    • Young leaders need to honor prior generations. Because of a lack of honor, we are limiting what could happen if generations can do if they worked together.
    • Respect is earned. Honor is given.
  4. For generations to work together, it must be intentional.
    • Create ongoing feedback loops.
    • Create specific mentoring moments.
    • Create opportunities for specific leadership development.

REFLECTION QUESTIONS:

  1. Think about your organization or team and identify which people would fit into the different generations:
    • Generation Z (Born 1996 – later)
    • Millennials (Born 1977 – 1995)
    • Generation X (Born 1965 – 1976)
    • Baby Boomers (Born 1946 – 1964)
    • Silent Generation (Born 1945 – Before)
  2. On your team, what strengths do you see in how generations work together? What are the sticking points?
  3. If you could improve one thing about how generations work together on your team, what would it be?

RESOURCES MENTIONED:

Psalm 71:18
Mark 6:4-6

Pastor Nick Harris

Lyle Schaller, church consultant

Dr. Timothy Elmore

Pastor Andy Stanley

Pastor Bill Hybels


RELATED LINKS:

Life.Church

Craig Groeschel Leadership Podcast

The Global Leadership Summit